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Descriptions of different levels of EAS?Society-Culture Courses

200-level EAS society-culture courses introduce broad themes and historical periods related to one or more regions of East Asia. These courses continue to promote the core concepts and skills as first introduced in our gateway courses (EAS103/105/209), aimed to help students undertake reference-based research work and to prepare students for upper-level courses.

Example:
EAS251H1 – Aesthetics and Politics in 20th Century Korea
This lecture course examines key questions and texts in the history of literature from the Korean peninsula during the twentieth century, exploring how aesthetic form refracted the experiences of colonialism, division, and the formation of opposing nation-states.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

300-level EAS society-culture courses?consist of more closely defined topics that bring about more depth and nuance of knowledge. They have a greater emphasis on writing, the use of critical concepts, and in-depth engagement with the material. Most courses will involve both lecture-based content and classroom discussion, although the exact proportion will vary from course to course. 300-level courses are typically limited to 50 students. (prerequisite: EAS105)

Example:
EAS349H1 – Soundscapes and Modern China

An introduction to sound studies through the case of modern China. The class surveys basic theories of sound studies. It investigates the technological, cultural, and social production of soundscapes in modern China. Topics include the invention of national language(s), the introduction of gramophone, radio, and sound cinema, and the relationship between sound, aesthetics, and power.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

400-level?EAS society-culture courses are seminars that deal with more specialized subjects that are often connected to a faculty’s research. They require extensive reading, writing, and in-class discussion. In most cases they also require from the student a research paper that develops original ideas about the material. They are limited to 20-25 students. (prerequisite: EAS209)

Example:?
EAS449H1 – Future, Architecture, Japan
Examination of how the future is imagined and materialized in architectural theory and practice throughout Japanese history. From classical temples to modernist experiments of the Metabolist movement to contemporary works by Isozaki Arata and Atelier Bow Wow, we study built and unbuilt structures as theories of the future.
Prerequisite: EAS209H1/ARC221H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)